Bloody Sunday (1972)

1971

A further six soldiers had been killed in Derry by mid-December 1971.

At least 1,332 rounds were fired at the British Army, who also faced 211 explosions and 180 nail bombs, and who fired 364 rounds in return. IRA activity also increased across Northern Ireland with thirty British soldiers being killed in the remaining months of 1971, in contrast to the ten soldiers killed during the pre-internment period of the year.

By the end of 1971, 29 barricades were in place to prevent access to what was known as Free Derry, 16 of them impassable even to the British Army's one-ton armoured vehicles.

1972

Bloody Sunday, or the Bogside Massacre, was a massacre on 30 January 1972 in the Bogside area of Derry, Northern Ireland, when British soldiers shot 26 civilians during a protest march against internment without trial.

Due to rioting and damage to shops caused by incendiary devices, an estimated total of worth of damage had been caused to local businesses. ===Lead-up to the march=== On 18 January 1972, Brian Faulkner, Prime Minister of Northern Ireland, banned all parades and marches in Northern Ireland until the end of the year. On 22 January 1972, a week before Bloody Sunday, an anti-internment march was held at Magilligan strand, near Derry.

He died on 16 June 1972; his death has been attributed to the injuries he received on the day.

No British soldier was wounded by gunfire or reported any injuries, nor were any bullets or nail bombs recovered to back up their claims. On 2 February 1972, the day that 12 of those killed were buried, there was a general strike in the Republic.

Paddy Ward claimed he was the leader of the Fianna √Čireann, the youth wing of the Provisional IRA in January 1972.

This song was one of few McCartney released with Wings to be banned by the BBC. The 1972 John Lennon album Some Time in New York City features a song entitled "Sunday Bloody Sunday", inspired by the incident, as well as the song "The Luck of the Irish", which dealt more with the Irish conflict in general.

Lennon, who was of Irish descent, also spoke at a protest in New York in support of the victims and families of Bloody Sunday. Irish poet Thomas Kinsella's 1972 poem Butcher's Dozen is a satirical and angry response to the Widgery Tribunal and the events of Bloody Sunday. Black Sabbath's Geezer Butler (also of Irish descent) wrote the lyrics to the Black Sabbath song "Sabbath Bloody Sabbath" on the album of the same name in 1973.

"30 January 1972" deals specifically with the events of Bloody Sunday. In mid-2005, the play Scenes from the Saville Inquiry, a dramatisation based on the Saville Inquiry, opened in London, and subsequently travelled to Derry and Dublin.

1973

Lennon, who was of Irish descent, also spoke at a protest in New York in support of the victims and families of Bloody Sunday. Irish poet Thomas Kinsella's 1972 poem Butcher's Dozen is a satirical and angry response to the Widgery Tribunal and the events of Bloody Sunday. Black Sabbath's Geezer Butler (also of Irish descent) wrote the lyrics to the Black Sabbath song "Sabbath Bloody Sabbath" on the album of the same name in 1973.

1998

The Saville Inquiry, chaired by Lord Saville of Newdigate, was established in 1998 to reinvestigate the incident.

In 2008 a former aide to British prime minister Tony Blair, Jonathan Powell, described Widgery as a "complete and utter whitewash". In 1998, Lt Col Derek Wilford expressed his anger at Tony Blair's intention of setting up the Saville inquiry, stating that he was proud of his actions on Bloody Sunday.

A second commission of inquiry, chaired by Lord Saville, was established in January 1998 to re-examine Bloody Sunday.

2000

Two years later in 2000 during an interview with the BBC, Wilford said: "There might have been things wrong in the sense that some innocent people, people who were not carrying a weapon, were wounded or even killed.

The other judges were John Toohey, a former Justice of the High Court of Australia who had worked on Aboriginal issues (he replaced New Zealander Sir Edward Somers, who retired from the Inquiry in 2000 for personal reasons), and William Hoyt, former Chief Justice of New Brunswick and a member of the Canadian Judicial Council.

2004

The hearings were concluded in November 2004, and the report was published 15 June 2010.

2007

In 2007, General (then Captain) Sir Mike Jackson, adjutant of 1 Para on Bloody Sunday, said: "I have no doubt that innocent people were shot".

2008

In 2008 a former aide to British prime minister Tony Blair, Jonathan Powell, described Widgery as a "complete and utter whitewash". In 1998, Lt Col Derek Wilford expressed his anger at Tony Blair's intention of setting up the Saville inquiry, stating that he was proud of his actions on Bloody Sunday.

2009

The cost of this process has drawn criticism; as of the publication of the Saville Report being . The inquiry was expected to report in late 2009 but was delayed until after the general election on 6 May 2010. The report of the inquiry was published on 15 June 2010.

2010

Following a 12-year investigation, Saville's report was made public in 2010 and concluded that the killings were "unjustified" and "unjustifiable".

The hearings were concluded in November 2004, and the report was published 15 June 2010.

The cost of this process has drawn criticism; as of the publication of the Saville Report being . The inquiry was expected to report in late 2009 but was delayed until after the general election on 6 May 2010. The report of the inquiry was published on 15 June 2010.

2013

In the run up to the loyalist marching season in 2013 the flag of the Parachute Regiment appeared alongside other loyalist flags in other parts of Northern Ireland.

2014

In 2014 loyalists in Cookstown erected the flags in opposition, close to the route of a Saint Patrick's Day parade in the town. ==Artistic reaction== Paul McCartney (who is of Irish descent) recorded the first song in response only two days after the incident.

2015

On 10 November 2015, a 66-year-old former member of the Parachute Regiment was arrested for questioning over the deaths of William Nash, Michael McDaid and John Young.

2019

He was released on bail shortly after. The Public Prosecution Service for Northern Ireland (PPS) announced in March 2019 that there was enough evidence to prosecute "Soldier F" for the murders of James Wray and William McKinney, both of whom were shot in the back.

2020

In September 2020, it was ruled that there would be no further charges against British soldiers. ==Impact on Northern Ireland divisions== Harold Wilson, then the Leader of the Opposition in the House of Commons, reiterated his belief that a united Ireland was the only possible solution to Northern Ireland's Troubles.




All text is taken from Wikipedia. Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License .

Page generated on 2021-08-05