Missouria

1720

The French explorer √Čtienne de Veniard, Sieur de Bourgmont visited the people in the early 1720s.

1723

He built Fort Orleans in 1723 as a trading post near present-day Brunswick, Missouri.

1726

It was occupied until 1726. In 1730 an attack by the Sauk/Fox tribe nearly destroyed the Missouria, killing hundreds.

1730

It was occupied until 1726. In 1730 an attack by the Sauk/Fox tribe nearly destroyed the Missouria, killing hundreds.

1780

After oil was discovered on their lands in 1912, the US government forced many of the tribe off their allotments. ==Population== According to the ethnographer James Mooney, the population of the tribe was about 200 families in 1702; 1000 people in 1780; 300 in 1805; 80 in 1829, when they were living with the Otoe; and 13 in 1910.

1805

After oil was discovered on their lands in 1912, the US government forced many of the tribe off their allotments. ==Population== According to the ethnographer James Mooney, the population of the tribe was about 200 families in 1702; 1000 people in 1780; 300 in 1805; 80 in 1829, when they were living with the Otoe; and 13 in 1910.

1829

After a smallpox outbreak in 1829, fewer than 100 Missouria survived, and they all joined the Otoe. They signed treaties with the US government in 1830 and 1854 to cede their lands in Missouri.

After oil was discovered on their lands in 1912, the US government forced many of the tribe off their allotments. ==Population== According to the ethnographer James Mooney, the population of the tribe was about 200 families in 1702; 1000 people in 1780; 300 in 1805; 80 in 1829, when they were living with the Otoe; and 13 in 1910.

1830

After a smallpox outbreak in 1829, fewer than 100 Missouria survived, and they all joined the Otoe. They signed treaties with the US government in 1830 and 1854 to cede their lands in Missouri.

1854

After a smallpox outbreak in 1829, fewer than 100 Missouria survived, and they all joined the Otoe. They signed treaties with the US government in 1830 and 1854 to cede their lands in Missouri.

1876

The US pressured the two tribes into ceding more lands in 1876 and 1881. In 1880 the tribes split into two factions, the Coyote, who were traditionalists, and the Quakers, who were assimilationists.

1880

The US pressured the two tribes into ceding more lands in 1876 and 1881. In 1880 the tribes split into two factions, the Coyote, who were traditionalists, and the Quakers, who were assimilationists.

1881

The US pressured the two tribes into ceding more lands in 1876 and 1881. In 1880 the tribes split into two factions, the Coyote, who were traditionalists, and the Quakers, who were assimilationists.

1890

By 1890 most of the Coyote band rejoined the Quakers on their reservation.

1900

The tribe merged with the Otoe tribe. The Curtis Act required the disbanding of tribal courts and governments in order to assimilate the people and prepare the territory for statehood, but the tribe created their own court system in 1900.

1907

Under the Dawes Act, by 1907 members of the tribes were registered and allotted individual plots of land per household.

1910

After oil was discovered on their lands in 1912, the US government forced many of the tribe off their allotments. ==Population== According to the ethnographer James Mooney, the population of the tribe was about 200 families in 1702; 1000 people in 1780; 300 in 1805; 80 in 1829, when they were living with the Otoe; and 13 in 1910.

1912

After oil was discovered on their lands in 1912, the US government forced many of the tribe off their allotments. ==Population== According to the ethnographer James Mooney, the population of the tribe was about 200 families in 1702; 1000 people in 1780; 300 in 1805; 80 in 1829, when they were living with the Otoe; and 13 in 1910.

1953

Swanton, The Indian Tribes of North America, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 145, Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office, 1953. Otoe-Missouria Genealogy Siouan peoples Great Lakes tribes Native American tribes in Missouri Native American tribes in Oklahoma Algonquian ethnonyms

2000

Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000.




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