Scalable Vector Graphics

1999

The SVG specification is an open standard developed by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) since 1999. SVG images and their behaviors are defined in XML text files.

2000

Additionally, editors like Inkscape and Boxy SVG provide tools to trace raster images to B├ęzier curves typically using image tracing back-ends like potrace, autotrace, and imagetracerjs. Software can be programmed to render SVG images by using a library such as librsvg used by GNOME since 2000, or Batik.

2003

Apart from this, there is very little difference between SVG 1.1 and SVG 1.0. * SVG Tiny and SVG Basic (the Mobile SVG Profiles) became W3C Recommendations on 14 January 2003.

SVG Basic was defined for higher-level mobile devices, such as smartphones. In 2003, the 3GPP, an international telecommunications standards group, adopted SVG Tiny as the mandatory vector graphics media format for next-generation phones.

2004

The site announced an option to restrict image searches to SVG files on 11 February 2011. ===Native browser support=== Konqueror was the first browser to support SVG in release version 3.2 in February 2004.

2005

It also supports SVGZ (compressed SVG). Browsers based on the Gecko layout engine (such as Firefox, Flock, Camino, and SeaMonkey) all have had incomplete support for the SVG 1.1 Full specification since 2005.

At the SVG Open 2005 conference, Sun demonstrated a mobile implementation of SVG Tiny 1.1 for the Connected Limited Device Configuration (CLDC) platform. Mobiles that use Opera Mobile, as well as the iPhone's built in browser, also include SVG support.

2006

Gecko 1.9, included in Firefox 3.0, adds support for more of the SVG specification (including filters). Pale Moon, which uses the Goanna layout engine (a fork of the Gecko engine), supports SVG. Browsers based on WebKit (such as Apple's Safari, Google Chrome, and The Omni Group's OmniWeb) have had incomplete support for the SVG 1.1 Full specification since 2006. Amaya has partial SVG support. Internet Explorer 8 and older versions do not support SVG.

2008

These are described as profiles of SVG 1.1. SVG Tiny 1.2 became a W3C Recommendation on 22 December 2008.

Gradients and patterns can be animated and scripted. Since 2008, there has been discussion among professional users of SVG that either gradient meshes or preferably diffusion curves could usefully be added to the SVG specification.

2011

Text, including internationalization and localization, appearing in plain text within the SVG DOM, enhances the accessibility of SVG graphics. The SVG specification was updated to version 1.1 in 2011.

It is generally poorly supported. SVG 1.1 Second Edition, which includes all the errata and clarifications, but no new features to the original SVG 1.1 was released on 16 August 2011. SVG Tiny 1.2 Portable/Secure, A more secure subset of the SVG Tiny 1.2 profile introduced as an IETF draft standard on July 29, 2020.

The site announced an option to restrict image searches to SVG files on 11 February 2011. ===Native browser support=== Konqueror was the first browser to support SVG in release version 3.2 in February 2004.

As of 2011, all major desktop browsers, and many minor ones, have some level of SVG support.

IE9 (released 14 March 2011) supports the basic SVG feature set.

2016

Scalable Vector Graphics 2 became a W3C Candidate Recommendation on 15 September 2016.

Some other 1.2 features are cherry-picked in, but SVG 2.0 is not a superset of SVG tiny 1.2 in general. It reached Candidate Recommendation stage on 15 September 2016.

2019

Microsoft 365 and Microsoft Office 2019 offer support for exporting, importing and editing SVG images.

2020

It is generally poorly supported. SVG 1.1 Second Edition, which includes all the errata and clarifications, but no new features to the original SVG 1.1 was released on 16 August 2011. SVG Tiny 1.2 Portable/Secure, A more secure subset of the SVG Tiny 1.2 profile introduced as an IETF draft standard on July 29, 2020.

The latest draft was released on 26 May 2020. ===Mobile profiles=== Because of industry demand, two mobile profiles were introduced with SVG 1.1: SVG Tiny (SVGT) and SVG Basic (SVGB). These are subsets of the full SVG standard, mainly intended for user agents with limited capabilities.




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