Turboprop

1900

The Airbus A400M is powered by four Europrop TP400 engines, which are the second most powerful turboprop engines ever produced, after the Kuznetsov NK-12. In 2017, the most widespread turboprop airliners in service were the ATR 42/72 (950 aircraft), Bombardier Q400 (506), De Havilland Canada Dash 8-100/200/300 (374), Beechcraft 1900 (328), de Havilland Canada DHC-6 Twin Otter (270), Saab 340 (225).

1917

Gloster Aircraft since 1917 (1971).

1926

This enables the propeller to rotate freely, independent of compressor speed. ==History== Alan Arnold Griffith had published a paper on compressor design in 1926.

1928

Jendrassik published a turboprop idea in 1928, and on 12 March 1929 he patented his invention.

1929

From 1929, Frank Whittle began work on centrifugal compressor-based designs that would use all the gas power produced by the engine for jet thrust. The world's first turboprop was designed by the Hungarian mechanical engineer Gy├Ârgy Jendrassik.

Jendrassik published a turboprop idea in 1928, and on 12 March 1929 he patented his invention.

1937

The larger Jendrassik Cs-1, with a predicted output of 1,000 bhp, was produced and tested at the Ganz Works in Budapest between 1937 and 1941.

1938

In 1938, he built a small-scale (100 Hp; 74.6 kW) experimental gas turbine.

1940

First run in 1940, combustion problems limited its output to 400 bhp.

1941

The larger Jendrassik Cs-1, with a predicted output of 1,000 bhp, was produced and tested at the Ganz Works in Budapest between 1937 and 1941.

In 1941, the engine was abandoned due to war, and the factory was turned over to conventional engine production. The first mention of turboprop engines in the general public press was in the February 1944 issue of the British aviation publication Flight, which included a detailed cutaway drawing of what a possible future turboprop engine could look like.

1944

In 1941, the engine was abandoned due to war, and the factory was turned over to conventional engine production. The first mention of turboprop engines in the general public press was in the February 1944 issue of the British aviation publication Flight, which included a detailed cutaway drawing of what a possible future turboprop engine could look like.

1945

It first flew on 20 September 1945.

The XP-81 first flew in December 1945, the first aircraft to use a combination of turboprop and turbojet power.

==Further reading== ==External links== Jet Turbine Planes by LtCol Silsbee USAAF, Popular Science, December 1945, first article on turboprops printed Wikibooks: Jet propulsion "Development of the Turboprop" a 1950 Flight article on UK and US turboprop engines Gas turbines Aircraft engines Jet engines

1948

Its first flight was on 16 July 1948.

The world's first single engined turboprop aircraft was the Armstrong Siddeley Mamba-powered Boulton Paul Balliol, which first flew on 24 March 1948. The Soviet Union built on German World War II turboprop preliminary design work by Junkers Motorenwerke, while BMW, Heinkel-Hirth and Daimler-Benz also worked on projected designs.

1950

The USA used turboprop engines with contra-rotating propellers, such as the Allison T40, on some experimental aircraft during the 1950s.

==Further reading== ==External links== Jet Turbine Planes by LtCol Silsbee USAAF, Popular Science, December 1945, first article on turboprops printed Wikibooks: Jet propulsion "Development of the Turboprop" a 1950 Flight article on UK and US turboprop engines Gas turbines Aircraft engines Jet engines

2000

Less widespread and older airliners include the BAe Jetstream 31, Embraer EMB 120 Brasilia, Fairchild Swearingen Metroliner, Dornier 328, Saab 2000, Xian MA60, MA600 and MA700, Fokker 27 and 50. Turboprop business aircraft include the Piper Meridian, Socata TBM, Pilatus PC-12, Piaggio P.180 Avanti, Beechcraft King Air and Super King Air.

2012

In April 2017, there were 14,311 business turboprops in the worldwide fleet. ===Reliability=== Between 2012 and 2016, the ATSB observed 417 events with turboprop aircraft, 83 per year, over 1.4 million flight hours: 2.2 per 10,000 hours.<!-- == Current engines == ==See also== Jet engine Jet aircraft Jetboat Propfan Ramjet Scimitar propeller Supercharger Tiltrotor Turbocharger Turbofan Turbojet Turboshaft ==References== ===Notes=== ===Bibliography=== Green, W.

2016

In April 2017, there were 14,311 business turboprops in the worldwide fleet. ===Reliability=== Between 2012 and 2016, the ATSB observed 417 events with turboprop aircraft, 83 per year, over 1.4 million flight hours: 2.2 per 10,000 hours.<!-- == Current engines == ==See also== Jet engine Jet aircraft Jetboat Propfan Ramjet Scimitar propeller Supercharger Tiltrotor Turbocharger Turbofan Turbojet Turboshaft ==References== ===Notes=== ===Bibliography=== Green, W.

2017

The Airbus A400M is powered by four Europrop TP400 engines, which are the second most powerful turboprop engines ever produced, after the Kuznetsov NK-12. In 2017, the most widespread turboprop airliners in service were the ATR 42/72 (950 aircraft), Bombardier Q400 (506), De Havilland Canada Dash 8-100/200/300 (374), Beechcraft 1900 (328), de Havilland Canada DHC-6 Twin Otter (270), Saab 340 (225).

In April 2017, there were 14,311 business turboprops in the worldwide fleet. ===Reliability=== Between 2012 and 2016, the ATSB observed 417 events with turboprop aircraft, 83 per year, over 1.4 million flight hours: 2.2 per 10,000 hours.<!-- == Current engines == ==See also== Jet engine Jet aircraft Jetboat Propfan Ramjet Scimitar propeller Supercharger Tiltrotor Turbocharger Turbofan Turbojet Turboshaft ==References== ===Notes=== ===Bibliography=== Green, W.




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